“Interracial Intimacy in Antebellum America” Panel Discussion a Success – Text Readable

Approximately 100 people gathered at Tuscaloosa’s Dinah Washington Cultural Arts Center last Tuesday (January 26) night to hear a panel presentation on the topic of Interracial Intimacy in Antebellum America from Dolen Perkins-Valdez, author of the New York Times bestseller Wench; Trudier Harris, Professor of English, The University of Alabama; Sharony Green, Assistant Professor of History, The University of Alabama; and Lisa Ze-Winters, Associate Professor of English, Wayne State University. The event was co-sponsored by The University of Alabama’s New […]

Read More from “Interracial Intimacy in Antebellum America” Panel Discussion a Success – Text Readable

“Interracial Intimacy in Antebellum America” Panel Discussion a Success.

Approximately 100 people gathered at Tuscaloosa’s Dinah Washington Cultural Arts Center last Tuesday (January 26) night to hear a panel presentation on the topic of Interracial Intimacy in Antebellum America from Dolen Perkins-Valdez, author of the New York Times bestseller Wench; Trudier Harris, Professor of English, The University of Alabama; Sharony Green, Assistant Professor of History, The University of Alabama; and Lisa Ze-Winters, Associate Professor of English, Wayne State University. The event was co-sponsored by The University of Alabama’s New […]

Read More from “Interracial Intimacy in Antebellum America” Panel Discussion a Success.

Doctoral Candidate’s Article Accepted for Publication in Civil War History

Doctoral candidate Lindsay Ray Smith‘s article,”More than Paper and Ink: Confederate Medical Literature and the Making of the Confederate Army Medical Corps,” has been accepted for publication in a forthcoming edition of Civil War History. Smith’s work explores the influence of medical literature in the development of Confederate nationalism and vice-versa. During the Civil War the Confederate Medical Department published a number of medical texts aimed at creating an efficient Medical Corps, many of which argued that being a good […]

Read More from Doctoral Candidate’s Article Accepted for Publication in Civil War History

“Five Ways to Read a Corpse,” with Mary Louise Roberts, WARF Distinguished Lucie Aubrac Professor and Plaenert Bascom Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin.

Is it morbid to study the history of the dead body? Historians have largely averted their eyes, as if the corpse stood beyond time and place, beyond life itself. With its stench and decay, the human corpse inspires revulsion; it compels us to look away. But the dead body arrested the attention of all those engaged in warfare–the officers, the grave diggers, the civilians, the infantrymen, and the grieving families. They were startled into witnessing, recording, and remembering the corpse […]

Read More from “Five Ways to Read a Corpse,” with Mary Louise Roberts, WARF Distinguished Lucie Aubrac Professor and Plaenert Bascom Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin.

Interracial Intimacy in Antebellum America: An Evening with Dolen Perkins-Valdez, Trudier Harris, Sharony Green, and Liza Ze-Winters

Black and white Southerners have “known” each other for centuries in ways not easily discussed. This conversation brings together four women scholars who have carefully addressed the subject of how these two groups have “intimately,” and not just sexually, encountered one another in complex ways before the Civil War and beyond. Dolen Perkins-Valdez, author of the New York Times bestseller Wench, joins Trudier Harris, Professor of English, University of Alabama, Sharony Green, Assistant Professor of History, University of Alabama, and […]

Read More from Interracial Intimacy in Antebellum America: An Evening with Dolen Perkins-Valdez, Trudier Harris, Sharony Green, and Liza Ze-Winters

The Nineteenth Century City Course Attracts Following

(From Sharony Green “Why I Teach“)   Dr. Sharony Green says that even though she can’t dance, and she knows she is getting old because her students have to tell her everything that is hip, videos like the one at the top of this entry remind her of some of the things she loves about her job: you may not think the students are paying attention, but they are. That the student who made this video wasn’t even her student, […]

Read More from The Nineteenth Century City Course Attracts Following

A&S’s Teaching Hub Features Dr. Juan Ponce-Vázquez’s Atlatl Lesson

from The Teaching Hub As someone who teaches courses on colonial Latin American history in Alabama, and previously in the rural northeast, I have not had many chances to bring history to life for my students. In the past, I have taken students to museums when a temporary exhibit came to a nearby city. For the most part, however, teaching within my discipline involves the classic things you have come to expect from a history class: lectures, active student participation […]

Read More from A&S’s Teaching Hub Features Dr. Juan Ponce-Vázquez’s Atlatl Lesson

“Five Ways to Read a Corpse,” with Mary Louise Roberts, WARF Distinguished Lucie Aubrac Professor and Plaenert Bascom Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin.

Is it morbid to study the history of the dead body? Historians have largely averted their eyes, as if the corpse stood beyond time and place, beyond life itself. With its stench and decay, the human corpse inspires revulsion; it compels us to look away.   But the dead body arrested the attention of all those engaged in warfare–the officers, the grave diggers, the civilians, the infantrymen, and the grieving families. They were startled into witnessing, recording, and remembering the corpse […]

Read More from “Five Ways to Read a Corpse,” with Mary Louise Roberts, WARF Distinguished Lucie Aubrac Professor and Plaenert Bascom Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin.

Peacock Appointed to the College of Arts & Sciences Leadership Board

Dr. Margaret Peacock, Associate Professor of Soviet History, was recently awarded a three year fellowship from the College of Arts and Sciences Leadership Board. Each year, the Leadership Board chooses three members of faculty who have demonstrated excellence as scholars and teachers to become fellows for a three-year term. During her fellowship, Dr. Peacock will conduct research on her second book, tentatively titled The Faults of Power: Cairo, Moscow, London, Washington, and the Struggle for the Modern Middle East, in […]

Read More from Peacock Appointed to the College of Arts & Sciences Leadership Board

The Nineteenth Century City Examines the Role of Women in Higher Education Between 1830 and 1920.

On December 2, from 4-5:30 pm, in The University of Alabama’s Gorgas House, students enrolled in “The Nineteenth Century City,” a course taught by Sharony Green, Assistant Professor of History, will present an exhibit on young women attending female academies and institutions of higher learning in West Alabama and other areas of the country. Between the 1830s and 1920, cities increasingly grew in the United States owing partly to the invention of the steamboat and railroads, two technologies that helped […]

Read More from The Nineteenth Century City Examines the Role of Women in Higher Education Between 1830 and 1920.

Dr. Margaret Peacock’s Teaching Methods Featured in the Collegian.

“Dr. Margaret Peacock is always asking ‘why.’ “Why, for instance, should she deliver a traditional-style lecture when technology and online classes have diminished its value? The answer, in Peacock’s eyes, is simple: She shouldn’t. “‘I’m not convinced that group work is best, either,’ said Peacock, an assistant professor in the Department of History. ‘Students hate group work. Inevitably, a few read, but others don’t and end up sitting there and receiving credit without contributing. It tells them that they don’t […]

Read More from Dr. Margaret Peacock’s Teaching Methods Featured in the Collegian.

Selesky Donates Comic Book Collection to UA Special Collections

Dr. Harold Selesky has donated his collection of comic books to The University of Alabama Libraries Special Collections. Many of these comic books are now being featured in an exhibit in Special Collections in Mary Harmon Bryant Hall, titled “Saving the Universe One Panel at a Time: Heroes & Superheroes of the Bronze Age of Comic Books and Beyond.” Comic books from the Bronze Age (1970-1985) often included darker narratives than those of the Silver Age (1955-1970), sometimes eschewing the […]

Read More from Selesky Donates Comic Book Collection to UA Special Collections

University of Wisconsin Prof. Ron Numbers to Present “Baptizing Dinosaurs: How Once-Suspect Evidence of Evolution Came to Support the Biblical Narrative,” Thursday, November 12, 2015, 7:30 PM

Dr. Ron Numbers, professor emeritus in the History of Science and Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison will be on the University of Alabama campus on Thursday, November 12 to speak as part of the ALLELE (ALabama LEctures on Life’s Evolution) seminar series. His talk, “Baptizing Dinosaurs: How Once-Suspected Evidence of Evolution Came to Support the Biblical Narrative,” will be at 7:30 pm in 125 ten Hoor Hall. Ron L. Numbers, Hilldale Professor of the History of Science and Medicine, […]

Read More from University of Wisconsin Prof. Ron Numbers to Present “Baptizing Dinosaurs: How Once-Suspect Evidence of Evolution Came to Support the Biblical Narrative,” Thursday, November 12, 2015, 7:30 PM