Undergraduate Studies

Spring 2020 Course Listings

UA Department of History
Spring 2020 Course Descriptions
Undergraduate

Note: There are no prerequisites for any courses in History. 300-level courses cap at 40 students and are lecture based. 400-level courses cap at 30 students, are discussion based, and usually have the “W” designation (double check below). 300 and 400-level courses have roughly the same workload.

HY 101 Western Civilization to 1648. A history of Western civilization from its origins in Greece and Rome through the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation, and the age of discovery and expansion during the emergence of modem Europe.

HY 102 Western Civilization since 1648. Covers the development if the Western world from the Thirty Years’ War to the post-World War II era; the age of absolutism, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, industrialization and the wars of the 20th century.

HY 103 American Civilization to 1865. A survey of American history from its beginning to the end of the Civil War, giving special emphasis to the events, people, and ideas that have made America a distinctive civilization. Prerequisite (s): None.

HY 104 American Civilization since 1865. A survey of American history from the Civil War to the present, giving special emphasis to the events, people, and ideas that have made America a distinctive civilization. Prerequisite(s): None

HY 105 Honors Western Civilization to 1648. A history of Western civilization from its origins in Greece and Rome through the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation, and the age of discovery and expansion during the emergence of modem Europe.

HY 106 Honors Western Civilization since 1648. Covers the development of the Western world from the Thirty Years’ War to the post-World War II era: the age of absolutism, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, industrialization, and the wars of the 20th century.

HY 107 Honors American Civilization to 1865. An honors-level approach to the American experience; parallel to HY 103. Prerequisite(s): Invitation of the department or membership in the University Honors Program.

HY 108 Honors American Civilization since 1865. An honors-level approach to the American experience.; parallel to HY 104. Prerequisite(s): Invitation of the department or membership in the University Honors Program.

HY 112-001 Modern Latin America since 1808. Professor Teresa Cribelli. MWF 9:00-9:50. Survey of political, economic, and social life in the 19th and 20th centuries with emphasis on the larger countries (Brazil, Mexico, and Argentina).

HY 116 History of Science Since 1687Professor Erik Peterson. MW 12-12:50 (additional recitation section required also. See myBama for details). Science and technology are ever-present in today’s world, defining not only how we live our daily lives but also shaping our conceptions and evaluations of modernity, civilization, and progress. How did science and technology become so important and pervasive to the modern world? This course is intended as an introduction to the history of modern science and technology from the Enlightenment to the present. Our focus will be on the development of science and technology in the Western World (Europe and North America). However, we will also make comparisons across cultures to explore how science and technology shaped notions of what counts as “Western” and “modern.” In addition to learning about key developments in the history of science and technology, from Ford’s Model-T to Einstein’s theory of relativity, we will address larger themes, including the relationship between science and religion and the role of technology in war and empire.

HY 118-001 World History since 1500. Professor Patrick Hurley. MWF 9-9:50. This course is a continuation of HY 117, Comparative World Civilizations. The course will examine the interactions between major world civilizations in Europe, Africa, and Asia. Course material will examine developments of history, politics, economics, and religion since 1500.

HY 114-001 Modern Asia since 1400. Professor Di Luo. TR 9:30-10:45. An introductory and comparative survey of modern Asian history that focuses on China, Korea, and Japan. We will examine major political, social, economic, and military issues that have shaped Asia from 1400 to the present. One goal of this course is to understand the evolution of sociopolitical structure in each country; a second goal is the study of the long-lasting interactions among these countries as well as their contact with the West.

HY 226-001 History of Alabama from 1865. Professor David Durham. TR 2-3:15. Survey of Alabama’s history and personalities since 1865: Reconstruction, agrarian revolt, Progressivism, the KKK, Dixiecrats and the Civil Rights movement.

HY 305-001 British Popular Culture & Music. Professor John Beeler. TR 11-12:15.

HY 306-001 History & Hunting in North America. Professor Julia Brock. MWF 9-9:50.

HY 306-002 Sexual Revolution in the US. Professor Lisa Lindquist-Dorr. TR 3:30-4:45.

HY 307-001 Mexico since 1810. Professor Steven Bunker. TR 8:00-9:15. An understanding of our southern neighbor’s history since its war of independence against Spain began in 1810 until the present-day “war on drugs.” From the tumultuous first decades defining Mexico’s borders, form of government, and identity against foreign invasion, students will learn how the Republic survived the nineteenth century and experienced rapid modernization under Porfirio Diaz. The subsequent Revolution of 1910 and radical Constitution of 1917 resulted in the shaping of present-day Mexico’s structures of government, society, economy, and national identity. Contemporary Mexico and its present-day challenges and promise wrap up the course.

HY 307-002 The Age of the Samurai. Professor Patrick Hurley. MWF 12:00-12:50. This course covers the history of Japan from earliest times, through to the medieval and Early Modem period down to the fall of the Tokugawa Shogunate in 1868. Students will examine how the Japanese, who shared a sense of national unity in their regard for the person of the emperor of Japan, were in practice divided largely by Japan’s feudal system which was dominated by the daimyo and their armed retainers, the samurai. As well as the political and military history of Japan receiving coverage during this period, students will also look at the social, religious, and economic environment in which the samurai lived, and how their code of bushido held them to higher standards than everyone else.

HY 309 The Great Cases in US Legal History. Professor Lawrence Cappello. TR 11:00-12:15. An exploration of the most impactful cases of American legal history from the colonial period to the internet age. Major themes include free speech cases, law in the workplace, slavery, Indian removal, federalism, the right to privacy, sexual discrimination law, civil rights law, crime prevention, gun control, the rights of the accused, and the relationship between church and state.

HY 315-001 The Civil War. Professor Harold Selesky. TR 12:30-1:45. This course examines how Americans used armed force to settle political differences during ‘America’s Thirty Years’ War’ (1845-1876). It focuses on why Americans resorted to war to settle sectional conflict in April 1861, how they created and manipulated vast armies and navies to defeat their opponents, and how the conflict evolved by April 1865 into something neither side had anticipated four years earlier. The Mexican-American War had reintroduced the problem of slavery expansion into American politics in 1845, and because Americans could not find a way to solve the issue politically in the next fifteen years, they decided to fight about it in a conflict that lasted for four blood-soaked years. Was Confederate failure (and Union success) inevitable? Why and how did the war end? How did the victors reconstruct the Union by 1876? How did the vanquished continue to resist? Did the Confederacy lose the war but the South win the peace? We will pay careful attention to how historians explain the ways Americans made war in this period, and how they explain success and failure. The goal is to hone your ability to analyze why a particular interpretation is or is not compelling. I will use lectures and images to ensure that everyone understands the information needed to make sense of the arguments, but the heart of the course is an attempt to help you answer the historians’ questions: “why?” and “so what?.”

HY 319-001 19th Century Black History. TBA. MWF 9-9:50. Role of black Americans in American life from the 17th century to the beginning of the 20th century, with emphasis on the institutions and events of the 1800s.

HY 322 US/Age of Franklin Roosevelt. Professor Charles P. Clark. MWF 12:00-12:50. The Great Depression and the Second World War were crucial in shaping the American political, social, economic and cultural landscape for decades, and continue to impact our lives today. Much of the era coincided with the presidency of Franklin Roosevelt, who was elected to an unprecedented four terms as president, and actually served in that office for thirteen years. The Age of Roosevelt class explore the problems that faced the United States in the thirties and forties, the solutions that generation tried in order to solve their problems, and the impact of policy on the inhabitants of the United States. The class will aid you in building critical thinking skills, give you a basic introduction to a set of historical literature, and expose you to primary sources from the Depression and the Second World War.

HY 324-001 US Constitutional History since 1877. Professor Lawrence Capello. TR 2-3:15. Continuation of HY 323, tracing developments up to the current Supreme Court.

HY 324-320 US Constitutional History since 1877. TBA. MW 6-7:15. Continuation of HY 323, tracing developments up to the current Supreme Court.

HY 328-001 How America Fights: War and Society since 1898. Professor Andrew Huebner. MW 2-3:15. This course will engage students in the study of war and American society since 1898. It is not a class about military strategy or foreign policy. Rather, we will survey the radiating impact of armed conflict and military service on individuals, communities, culture, and politics. And in the other direction, we will examine the ways fundamental features of American society (race, gender, class, citizenship, sexual orientation, and so on) influence the country’s military experience. To give shape to such a vast subject, we will organize our inquiry around three questions: How do Americans mobilize for, fight, and remember their wars? Together those dimensions describe a society in the throes of militarization and perhaps militarism and/or anti-militarism. We will explore the difference between these ideas and assess which of them, if any, characterizes the United States in this period. These questions and terms will guide our main effort: to scrutinize the ways America’s experience with armed conflict has reflected and shaped broader truths about society in the past century.

HY 329-001 American Religious History to 1870. Professor Margaret Abruzzo. TR 9:30-10:45. An introduction to American religious history from the first encounters between Native Americans and Europeans through the mid-nineteenth century. The course will explore important religious traditions and consider the connections between religious values and crucial questions in American history.

HY 330-001 The Civil Rights Movement. Professor Kari Frederickson. MW 3-4:15. History of the leaders, organizations, and events of the Civil Rights Movement during the years 1945 to 1968.

HY 341-001 History of the US-Vietnam War. TBA. TR 11-12:15. Survey of the historical background of the conflict in Indochina leading to U.S. involvement and its consequences.

HY 342-001 History of the US from WWI to WWII. Professor David Beito. TR 12:30-1:45. This is a survey of U.S. history from World War I to World War II with an emphasis on the role of politics, popular culture, and economic change.

HY 345-001 Race and Science. Professor Erik Peterson. MW 2-3:15. Race and Science examines the diverse interactions between science and race from the 18th century to the present era of human genomics. The class looks both at the scientific study of race and the impact of racial concepts on science. These interactions have given us: Nazi medicine, American eugenics, the Tuskegee experiments, and “race specific” contemporary pharmaceuticals. By the end of this course, students will have the opportunity to write (with consultation) a publishable-quality essay on one aspect of this important issue in history and bioscience ethics.

HY 358-001 World War II. Professor Charles P. Clark. MWF 10-10:50 am. The global conflict, or series of conflicts, from Manchukuo in 1931 to Tokyo Bay in 1945, with emphasis on battles on land and sea and in the air, life on the home fronts and in enemy-occupied areas, and the legacy of the war to future generations. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

HY 362-001 Russia-Soviet Union since 1894. Professor Margaret Peacock. MW 3-4:15. Crisis in Russian society and the coming of the Revolution; the emergence of Stalinism; and political developments since World War II, including the disintegration of the Soviet system.

HY 370-001 A history of the Atlantic World, 1400-1800. Professor Jenny Shaw. TR 9:30-10-45. In what ways did the Atlantic Ocean resemble an early-modern super-highway, moving people, ideas, and products across its waters? How did the individuals who shaped this world – rebellious slaves, elite planters, Aztec emperors, wayward sailors, Kongolese kings, infamous pirates and radical revolutionaries – contribute to the creation of this vibrant and dynamic world? A History of the Atlantic World answers these questions by tracing four centuries of interactions among Europeans, Africans and Native Americans, from the first European forays down the west coast of Africa in the fifteenth century, to the turbulent Age of Revolutions at the close of the eighteenth century.

HY 385-001 History of Greece. Professor Patrick Hurley. TR 3:30-4:45. This course examines the History of Greece from its Minoan and Mycenaean origins in the 3rd millennium BC through to the end of the Classical Age which ended with the death of Alexander the Great (356-323 BC). By examining literary and archaeological source materials, students will especially focus on the periods of the Archaic and Classical Ages. In doing so, they will get a better understanding of Ancient Greece’s political, religious, economic, social, and philosophical history. While special attention will be given to Athens, the birthplace of democracy, as well as the militaristic society of Sparta, attention will be given as well to those areas of the Mediterranean colonized by the Greeks such as the Ionian Coast as well as Sicily.

HY 386-001 History of Rome. Professor Kelly Shannon-Henderson. TR 2-3:15.

HY 405-001 Monks, Masters, Mystics and Heretics: Education and Culture in the Later Middle Ages. Professor James Mixson. MWF 10:00-10:50. This course explores the intellectual and religious landscape of later medieval Europe (c. 1200-1500) through the interpretive lens of its leading intellectual figures-monks (and nuns), university masters, mystics and heretics. It begins with the cultural foundations of monastic and cathedral school learning, the “Renaissance” of the twelfth century and the rise of the early university. It then explores in detail the story of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, an era once dismissed for its decadence and irrelevance but now increasingly recognized as a crucial and dynamic period. The main requirement of the course, which carries a W designation, is a substantial research paper of c. 12-15 pages. There are no prerequisites, although prior enrollment in Western Civilization to 1648 and/or other courses touching on the Middle Ages will be helpful.

HY 406-001 Theory & Practice of Oral History. Professor Julia Brock. M 2:00-4:30. The purposes of this course are twofold: to expose you to the theory, major conceptual themes, and methodologies that oral historians use to frame and implement their work, and to hone your skills as an oral history practitioner. Oral history has become especially common since the 1970s, when scholars who wanted to write “history from below” had trouble constructing those histories from traditional archival sources. Since then the field has exploded, from the growth of oral history collections around the world to popular forms of story collecting, such as StoryCorps. With the digital ‘revolution’ of the 2000s, there are now even more ways to collect, preserve, and share oral history interviews. The readings and assignments of this course will deepen your understanding of how the field has grown and changed, and how practitioners have reconceptualized and redefined oral history practice over time. More specifically, we will cover the following themes: the connection between memory, history, and narrative; ethics; oral tradition and oral history; interviewing across cultural, age, gender, and ethnic bounds; power in the oral history interview; advocacy and oral history; oral history and public history; the effect of digital humanities on oral history practice, and more. Most importantly, you will conduct, transcribe, and analyze an oral history interview, putting theory, in effect, to practice. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

HY 409-001 American Revolution/New Nation. Professor Harold Selesky. TR 12:30-1:45. The development of revolutionary sentiment in the North American colonies, the resulting revolution, and the subsequent efforts to establish the new nation. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

HY 430-001 The Long Civil Rights Movement. Professor John Giggie. T 3:00-5:30. This undergraduate research seminar will allow students to explore some of the major dimensions in the history of the civil rights movement in America with a special focus on Alabama, including emergence of black protest, the rise of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Southern Christian Leadership Council, the theory of non-violence, white “backlash,” legal controversies, black power, and the role of film and media. Students will compose an original research essay as the main focus of the class, but they will also be introduced to the craft of history, learn basic historical research techniques, consult with librarians, conduct both primary and secondary research, and peer review drafts. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

HY 430-002 The Crusades. Professor James Mixson. W 2:00-4:30. This course explores, from multiple perspectives, the troubled medieval marriage of religion and violence known as “Crusade.” It offers not only an overview of the traditional, largely military narrative of “numbered” crusades. It also explores the broader view – the general context of “holy war” down to c. 1100; tensions between the ideal and reality of crusading; the social and cultural impact of the Crusades, for good and ill; the Muslim perception of the “Franj” as both invaders and neighbors, and the long afterlife of the crusades down through the early modem period. The ultimate aim of this course is to complete an original, primary-source based research project. Students will work in close consultation with both the instructor and with peers to explore and engage a topic in Crusade studies, to develop an extensive bibliography, to research and write a formal written research paper of 15-20 pages. There are no prerequisites for the course, although prior enrollment in HY 388 and/or HY 442/443 will be beneficial. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

HY 430-003. Themes in Latin American History. Professor Teresa Cribelli. M 2:00-4:30. In this course, students will devise a research project of their choosing on a topic in the colonial or modem history of Latin America or US-Latin American Relations. In conjunction with the instructor, students will explore the nature and process of historical research, identify a topic for their semester’s work, conduct primary and secondary source research, and write up their findings in an original paper at least fifteen pages in length. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

HY 430-004 Antebellum American Swagger. Professor Sharony Green. R 3:00-5:30. This course explores the-confidence of people in and outside-the Old Southwest during-the antebellum period. Using historical documents, books and films, students will learn more about the human spirit as revealed in political, social and economic developments between the War of 1812 and the Civil War. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

HY 430-005 Exploration and Empire. Professor Matthew Lockwood. T 2:00-4:30. From the Age of Exploration in the 15th century to the Age of Empire and beyond, human history has been fundamentally shaped by moments and periods of cross-cultural interaction. In this research seminar, students will examine and interpret such historical moments of cross-cultural contact and exchange using a wide array of primary sources. Students will pick any historical period or instance of cross-cultural contact that appeals to their interests and then engage in extensive primary source research to create an original research essay. This class asks students to consider the importance of cross-cultural interactions historically and to use their own original research and writing to assess the influence of such moments on the development of the modem world. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

HY 471-001 Age of Exploration and Conquest. TBA. MWF 2-2:50. A history of exploration during the 15th and 16th centuries, when European nations expanded by sea voyages and conquest, settling in the Americas, Africa, and Asia.

HY 473-001 Indians, Nuns, and Rogues: Cities in Colonial Latin America. Professor Juan José Ponce-Vázquez. TR 11-12:15. This course explores the features that defined the Spanish world during this period by focusing on the most significant urban spaces in the Spanish world and their citizens. We will learn about larger demographic, social, cultural, and environmental issues that affected, and sometimes defined, the Spanish empire as a whole. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

HY 474-001 Relations with US and Latin America. Professor Steven Bunker. TR 8:00-9:15. A survey of US-Latin American relations spanning from the birth of the American Republics up to the present day. The Monroe Doctrine was the cornerstone of US policy in the region for over 150 years, and an analysis of its origin, interpretations, and evolution serves as the unifying theme for this course. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

HY 477 Imperial Spain’s “Golden Age.” Professor Juan José Ponce-Vázquez. TR 2:00-3:15 Spain in the 15th century was a society in crisis, fractured and immersed in civil war, and by the 16th century it had become a powerful empire with possessions all over Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. During the 17th century, Spain entered into a period of political crisis from which it would not completely recover. This is also a period known as “The Golden Age”, a time of high accomplishments by artists, writers, and playwrights. We will trace the history of the region from the late medieval period to understand the place of Iberian society in the western Mediterranean, the roots of the Spanish empire, its impact on Spanish society, Europe, and the Americas. We will spend a good time of the semester reading Miguel de Cervantes’ “Don Quijote,” one of the true masterpieces of world literature, a direct product of Spanish society and culture during these times, and a great reflection (and critique) of its values. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

HY 481-001 War/Dipl. In Med & Modern Europe. Professor Daniel Riches. TR 9:30-10:45. This course examines developments in European warfare and diplomatic practice in the late medieval and early modern periods. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

HY 490-001 England Under the Tudors. TBA. TR 11-12:15. Development of an early modern state: establishment of a strong central monarchy, religious crises from the Reformation to the Puritan movement, and exuberance and excess of an expanding society. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

HY 494 Britain in the Victorian Age. Professor John Beeler. TR 2:00-3:15. Great Britain racked up an impressive number of “firsts” during the course of the nineteenth century: it was the first industrialized country in the world, the first urban society, one of the first countries to establish a mass electoral representative government, and the first to suffer industrial decline, to mention only the most dramatic transformations which took place between 1815 and 1914. This course will survey all of these subjects and many others. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.